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Exhibit by Hunter Cole and Electric Eye Neon


Wearing lab coats and radiation detections badges viewers become a part of the exhibit.
Photo of the exhibition at the Walker's Point Center for the Arts, April 20-June 2, 2001.
Radioactive Biohazard Tour Itinerary
Media Room: Press Release and High Resolution Images for the Media

University of Wisconsin-Madison Porter Butts Gallery, January 24 - February 23, 2003

University of Michigan Warren Robbins Gallery, Sept. 3 - 26, 2002

Walker's Point Center for the Arts, April 20-June 2, 2001

Laboratory Installation

Abstractions on Biotechnology

Digital Art

Neon Art

The System Forgets Scientists Are Only Human, 2001-2002
Detail: DNA Visualized
with UV Light

Madonna con Clon
2001
A human clone is
a unique individual.

Anthrax Clock
2002
Features Micrographs
of Anthrax

Red Marrow
2001
Media:
Animals Bones and Neon

Radioactive Biohazard is a controversial art installation by Hunter Cole, artist and geneticist. Radioactive Biohazard reinterprets science as art, through imagery drawn from and inspired by her extensive experience in biotechnology. Cole confronts issues related to human cloning, stem cell research, the big brother aspect of the human genome project, DNA testing in criminology and the potential to create the genetic children of gay and lesbian couples.

The radioactive and biohazard symbols have become icons in the media seen anywhere from laboratories in news reports to bumper stickers and t-shirts. Some have used these symbols to emphasize the pitfalls of biotechnology. In the Radioactive Biohazard exhibit, these symbols are used to emphasize the benefits of biotechnology with a consideration for both sides of the issues.

The centerpiece of Radioactive Biohazard is a laboratory bench installation displaying actual products of scientific experiments such as DNA visualized with UV light, preserved laboratory animals, x-rays and vials used to store radioactivity.

Radioactive Biohazard introduces genetic research through the visceral beauty of microscopic images of deadly diseases, such as ebola and cancer. Cole collaborated with Marj Inman, the neon artist of Electric Eye Neon, to create enlargements of digitally arranged fluorescent micrographs of actual cells, viruses and bacteria highlighted with patterns in neon. An enlarged image of HIV is as visually stunning as it is intellectually horrifying. Mixed media using abstract, figurative and biomorphic imagery relate to, comment on, and explore the implications of biotechnology for our culture. This exhibit will bring people into a world known to most only through movies such as Jurassic Park and Outbreak. Cole’s Radioactive Biohazard confronts controversial and frightening issues of our day through the universal language of art.

For more details, please read the press release.

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Exhibit Tour at Walker's Point Center for the Arts

Media Coverage of Radioactive Biohazard

John Carlos Cantu, "Joining art, science: Geneticist's work, on display at Robbins Gallery, explores ethics," Ann Arbor News, September 14, 2002.

Frank Provenzano, "DNArtist: The lab inspires geneticist's artwork, on exhibit at U-M," Detroit Free Press, September 4, 2002.

Frank Provenzano, "Biotechnology and ethics," Detroit Free Press, September 4, 2002.

Colleen Newvine, "Geneticist brings art exhibit about ethical questions of science to U-M," University Record, September 3, 2002.

Kyle Norris, "Splicing Art and Science," Current Magazine, September 2002.

Birgit Reinert, "'Abstractions on Biotechnology' by Hunter Cole," Genome News Network (gnn.tigr.org), August 30, 2002.

Kristen Philipkoski, "Behold: 'Ebola Is Beautiful'," Wired News (Wired.com), August 19, 2002.

Birgit Reinert, "Reinterpreting Biotechnology: 'Digital Art' by Hunter Cole," Genome News Network (gnn.tigr.org), August 16, 2002.

Constance Holden, "Yes, This Is Art," Science, July 26, 2002.

Bill Robbins, "Art and Science," Kenosha News, March 6, 2002.

Geary Morales, "Can Art and Science Coexist, or Is the Partnership an Oxymoron? Dr. Hunter Cole, Geneticist, Artist Takes on Conventional Wisdom!" Milwaukee Post, May 26, 2001.

Michelle C. Boyle, "Science, Art Present Wild Mixture of Form," Irish American Post, May 2001.

Bryan Wawzenek, "The Art of Science: Scientist Makes Diseases Look as Pleasant as Paintings," Marquette Tribune, April 25, 2001.

Nicholas Frank, "Radioactive Biohazard at WPCA," The Orbit, April 2001.

"Radioactive Biohazard: Dr. Hunter Cole, Ph.D. and Electric Eye Neon," AbsoluteArts.com Arts News, April 20, 2001.

Nathan Guequierre, "Critics Choice for Visual Art," Shepherd Express, April 19 - April 25, 2001.

Jon Mueller & OMC Staff Writers, "Cole Reinterprets Science as Art," OnMilwaukee.com, April 16, 2001.


Radioactive Biohazard: Reinterpreting Biotechnology as Art
is sponsored by the




University of Michigan Life Sciences, Values and Society Program

The Life Sciences Institute at the University of Michigan

The Department of Human Genetics at the University of Michigan

Penny W. Stamps Distinguished Artist Series, School of Art and Design at the University of Michigan

The Science, Technology & Society Program at the University of Michigan

The Genetics and Public Health Program, School of Public Health at the University of Michigan

Gifts of Art, University of Michigan Heath System

Program in Culture, Health and Medicine at the University of Michigan

The Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) at the University of Michigan

The Women in Science and Engineering Residence Program (WISE-RP) at the University of Michigan

Health Science Scholars Program at the University of Michigan

Students Exploring the Life Sciences and Society at the University of Michigan

The Puffin Foundation
The first organization to provide support for the Radioactive Biohazard exhibit.

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Cultures and Communities Program

Fisher Scientific
Many supplies for the laboratory installation were generously donated by
Dr. Phil Kneisel at Fisher Scientific.

Fotodyne
Dr. Brian P. Walsh, President of Fotodyne, kindly loaned a
UV transilluminator and electrophoresis equipment for the laboratory installation.

University of Michigan Warren Robbins Gallery
The Radioactive Biohazard exhibit will be shown at the Warren Robbins Gallery, September 3 - 26, 2002.

University of Wisconsin-Madison Porter Butts Gallery
The Radioactive Biohazard exhibit will be shown at the Porter Butts Gallery, January 24 - February 25, 2003.

Walker's Point Center for the Arts (WPCA)
The Radioactive Biohazard exhibit premiered at the WPCA, April 20 - June 2, 2001.


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Copyright © 2000-2002 Hunter Cole